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Second Chance for Pets
P.O. Box 243
Clinton, IL 61727
phone: 217.935.3488 secondchanceforpets@yahoo.com

Are you ready for a pet?

Questions to ask yourself before bringing a pet into your home

Pets are often a 10-15 year investment. Before you bring a pet into your home, make sure that your home will be that pet’s forever home. Here are some questions you can ask yourself to make sure that you are ready to bring a new pet into your home.

  1. Can I afford a new pet? High quality food, treats, toys, grooming, annual vet exams, emergency vet expenses.
  2. Will my living arrangement allow me to have a pet? Homeowners’ insurance, HOA, or landlord approval; large enough space for the pet; etc.
  3. Do I have the time to dedicate to training my new pet? Housebreaking, chewing, barking, begging, etc.
  4. Am I okay with the fact that it sometimes takes several weeks for a pet to acclimate to his/her new home?
  5. Do I have the time to give my new pet the attention it needs on a daily basis? Training upkeep, daily exercise, play time, etc.
  6. If my hours at work were to change, would I still have enough time for my new pet, or would I rehome him/her?
  7. If I were to lose my job, would I still be able to afford to feed my pet? Would I know who to contact for assistance if I needed it?
  8. If I were to lose my home, would I be able to find a place to live that would allow me to bring my pet? What would I do with my pet if I couldn’t?
  9. If someone in my family were to develop allergies to the pet, what would I do?
  10. If my pet were to need emergency surgery, would I be able to afford it, or would I at least know where to look for payment assistance?
  11. If my pet were to develop behavioral issues, how would I handle them?

These are just a few of the many questions you’ll need to ask yourself before you determine if a new pet is right for you. Too often we here “I need to get rid of this puppy because my landlord won’t let me keep him” or “We need to get rid of our new kitten because we just found out that our daughter is allergic to cats.” Had these people thought about these situations BEFORE they brought a pet into their home, their pets wouldn’t be going through the heartbreak of abandonment. Your pet relies on you for everything; if you bring one into your home, make sure it’s for its lifetime.

May 2010